Arts programs

Financial disadvantage can prevent children and young people from getting involved in opportunities that supplement classroom learning and stimulate personal growth.

High school students photography exhibition

Financial disadvantage can prevent children and young people from getting involved in opportunities that supplement classroom learning and stimulate personal growth.

There is a growing body of evidence that the development of non-cognitive skills in children and young people, such as motivation and self-confidence, can influence schooling and employment achievements.1 Disadvantaged children growing up in environments of financial stress often have limited family and social networks or access to opportunities and resources, and may struggle to have their social and emotional needs met.

Research and our own experience tells us that when students participate in creative enrichment programs and initiatives aimed at developing their social and emotional capabilities, it can help increase their attachment to school, improve their confidence, and build their aspirations for further education.2

We place value on providing extra-curricular opportunities to disadvantaged students to help support their social and emotional development and build on their emerging talents and interests.3

CONverge bringing students together from across Sydney

In 2105 we are celebrating 10 years of CONverge, which has been helping disadvantaged students from schools in Western Sydney find a voice since 2005.

Take a glimpse behind the scenes of the 2014 CONverge program and the final concert that brought together students from Fairfield, Mitchell and Cranebrook High Schools at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music.

2014 CONverge concert

"To be able to sing makes you feel happy, makes you feel stronger, it gives you more confidence." - Sarah, CONverge program participant.